Dyson on largest ever recruitment drive – BBC

Dyson on largest ever recruitment drive – BBC

Dyson aims to hire more than 2,000 new staff after making a £1.5bn profit in 2021.
The company is looking for engineers and digital specialists, with 900 roles based in the UK, in Wiltshire and Bristol.
Annual revenue for Dyson was up 5% last year, rising to £6bn worldwide.
It said its largest ever recruitment drive is to help contribute to the "development of radical new technologies".
Dyson said it had sold more than 70 million cord-free machines around the world, and 20 million haircare products.
James Dyson, founder and chief engineer, said: "We like looking at problems in the wrong way and pioneering our own solutions. As a result, we are succeeding and growing. But to continue this exciting journey we need the best and brightest engineers and digital experts to join us."
The company says it currently employs 3,250 engineers and scientists worldwide, half of which are based in the UK.
It now wants to recruit at what it calls its "key locations", including campuses at Malmesbury and Hullavington Airfield in Wiltshire, as well as Bristol city centre.
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